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Posts Tagged ‘ohio bwc’

Construction worker’s fraud scheme collapses

A Marion man who claimed to be permanently disabled owes the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) $160,000 after pleading guilty Wednesday to a fourth-degree felony charge of workers’ compensation fraud.

Appearing in a Franklin County courtroom, Jimmie Rankin, 45, was also sentenced to five years of community control for collecting BWC benefits after he had gone back to work in the construction industry and deliberately withheld that information from BWC.

“We found Mr. Rankin working as a subcontractor and getting paid with cash and checks made out to other people so he could avoid a paper trail and stay beneath our radar,” said Jim Wernecke, director of BWC’s Special Investigations Department. “But thanks in part to tips from honest citizens, we were able to stop this fraud and bring Mr. Rankin to justice.”

Working with Rankin’s employers, investigators determined Rankin had been employed at least since March 2011, a little more than three years after his workplace injury and while he was collecting temporary disability benefits. He later secured permanent total disability benefits from BWC and, while working, collected those benefits from June 2012 to May 2016.

A judged warned Rankin that if he violates the terms of his community control, he would serve 18 months in prison.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Gamble on work comp fraud comes up lemons

A Toledo woman who managed a gambling storefront that was raided by state agents in 2014 pleaded guilty March 21 to workers’ compensation fraud for working there while collecting injured worker benefits from the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC).

Jennifer E. Garner, 57, pleaded guilty to the first-degree misdemeanor in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas. A judge ordered Garner to pay BWC $7,645 in restitution and sentenced her to five years of community control and a suspended jail term of four months. Garner paid $1,000 prior to her guilty plea.

“Trying to cheat BWC is never a safe bet,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Sarah Morrison. “Our Special Investigations Department is dedicated to rooting out fraud and bringing criminals to justice.”

Acting on a tip, BWC investigators found Garner managing and working at the Surf’s Up Cyberlounge in Oregon, Ohio, through most of 2014 while she collected benefits from BWC for a job injury that purportedly left her permanently and totally disabled.

On Dec. 18, 2014, agents with the Attorney General’s Office, Ohio Casino Control Commission and Oregon Police Department executed a search warrant at Surf’s Up and five other similar storefronts in northwest Ohio on suspicion of operating as illegal casinos. Gaming machines were removed from each of the six locations, but no arrests were made. Prosecutors ultimately declined to pursue the case against Surf’s Up.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

SID donations brighten holidays for children in need

The elves in BWC’s Special Investigations Department (SID) were busy again this holiday season.

A truckload of toys were delivered Dec. 16 to the Columbus Fire Department Engine House #1 in downtown Columbus for its Firefighters for Kids toy drive.

A $500 check also went to Franklin County Children’s services for their holiday wish program, and 42 gift cards worth $545 were delivered to Dayton Children’s Hospital for patients and families in need.

The donations are a holiday tradition in SID, and the highlight of our year.

All of us in BWC’s SID wish you a happy holiday season and all the best in the New Year!

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(left to right) Fraud Analyst Beth Parker, Fraud Investigator Kelli Anderson and Special Agent in Charge Shawn Fox deliver gift cards to Kristi Brown (pictured next to Fox) with Dayton Children’s Hospital.

Becky Donchess, Vern Davenport, Pam Hunnicutt and Darrin Blosser of BWC’s Special Investigations Department deliver donations to Columbus Fire Department Engine House #1 in downtown Columbus.

Cleveland painter guilty of workers’ comp fraud

reillo-photoA Cleveland-area man caught working while receiving injured workers’ benefits from BWC pleaded guilty Dec. 1 to a misdemeanor count of workers’ compensation fraud.

Angelo Reillo Sr., 32, of Garfield Heights, paid $3,354 in restitution to BWC at the time of his guilty plea in Franklin County Common Pleas Court. A judge fined him $50.

Acting on a tip, agents with BWC’s Special Investigations Department found Reillo working as a painter and supervisor from Oct. 20, 2014, until Dec. 3 that year while receiving living maintenance benefits from BWC. Living maintenance compensation is designed for workers who are actively participating in a BWC-approved vocational rehabilitation plan. The benefits are supposed to end after the injured worker returns to full-time work.

Agents determined Reillo engaged in “ongoing and regular substantially gainful remunerative employment, which was inconsistent with the receipt of LM benefits and contrary to entitlement.”

Fraud conviction stains carpet cleaner’s record

A Florida man who had been collecting injured workers’ benefits from Ohio since 2011 pleaded guilty to workers’ compensation fraud Monday after investigators with the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation found him working as a carpet cleaner in Florida.

Jarrod B. Lewis, 40, of Palm Bay, Florida, must pay $5,300 in restitution to BWC and serve five years probation in lieu of a 12-month prison sentence for committing the fifth-degree felony, a Franklin County Common Pleas Court judge ruled Nov. 28.

Lewis, formerly of Chillicothe, Ohio, was working as a youth specialist for the Ohio Department of Youth Services when he was injured on the job in 2011. BWC’s Special Investigations Department started looking at Lewis in October 2013 after getting an anonymous tip that he was living and working in Florida. Agents determined Lewis returned to full-time work in April 2013 but intentionally withheld this information from BWC to receive benefits for which he was not entitled.

To report suspected workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Auto mechanic owes BWC $132,000 for workers’ comp fraud

Former construction worker ran auto repair shop out of his home

perezA Southern Ohio man who collected injured workers’ benefits for four years while running an automobile repair shop out of his residence must pay $132,239 in restitution to the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) and serve five years probation.

Manuel Perez, 59, of West Portsmouth in Scioto County, pleaded guilty Monday, Nov. 21, in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas to misdemeanor counts of workers’ compensation fraud and theft. He paid $10,000 toward his restitution to BWC at his sentencing. He also was sentenced to six months in jail, which was suspended so long as he complies with the terms of his probation.

“This case took four long years to investigate and prosecute, and I’m proud our investigators pushed it forward,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Sarah Morrison. “Mr. Perez’s restitution will go where those funds rightfully belong – caring for injured workers and creating safer workplaces across this state.”

BWC’s Special Investigations Department (SID) got a tip in November 2012 that Perez was working for his own business, M A Perez Enterprises, as a mechanic while filing an application for permanent total disability benefits from BWC. The source reported that Perez was able to crawl underneath vehicles, push and pull equipment and use wrenches to repair vehicles.

Investigators found Perez had continued to operate his mechanic’s business during a period in which he also received temporary total benefits, September 2007 to November 2011. Agents obtained bank records that provided customer names and payments and receipts from an auto parts store totaling $43,000. The customers were interviewed and identified Perez as the owner/operator of the business.

Perez’s case took years to resolve as it made its way through BWC, the Ohio Industrial Commission (IC) and the court system.

Perez was injured in December 2002 while working for a construction company and was later granted injured workers’ benefits. Roughly four months after SID began its investigation in 2012, an IC hearing officer determined Perez was overpaid and had committed fraud because he operated his automobile repair business without telling BWC. Perez denied those findings and unsuccessfully appealed his case all the way to the Ohio Supreme Court.

To report suspected cases of workers’ compensation fraud, call 1-800-644-6292 or visit bwc.ohio.gov.

Fraud funnies: Workers’ comp cheats say the darndest things

By Tony Gottschlich, Public Information Officer, BWC Communications Department

SID Badge and SealMany of us have read funny reports of the ridiculous excuses criminals give police for their illicit behavior, from, “We’re not stealing; we thought it was free,” to Winona Ryder’s, “I shoplifted to prepare for an acting role.”

Our agents in the Special Investigations Department have heard a few whoppers over the years, too. In honor of International Fraud Awareness Week, here’s a sampling. (Note: Each subject was ultimately convicted and sentenced.)

During surveillance, the claimant suspect would appear to drive as if he knew he was under investigation.  He would drive south, north and in circles before going to a job site. During the interview, I asked him if he knew he had been under surveillance. His answer was, “No, I drove that way just in case I was under investigation.”


While wearing boots and standing in wet concrete with a concrete trowel in hand, the claimant suspect stated he was only a “stock holder” in the business.


Upon commencing an interview of the claimant suspect, agents asked him if he was “Joe.” The subject replied, “No.”  He was wearing a shirt with his employer’s name and his own name on it. He confessed to his misdeeds.


A doctor was getting increasingly frustrated during an interview when he was trying to explain to Health Care Provider Team agents why he billed BWC for services not rendered. Each time he gave his “explanation,” the agent replied, “So, you billed services that were not provided.”  The doctor told the agent he was not listening and again launched into his “explanation.”  After the third or fourth round of this conversation, the agent basically restated that the services billed were not provided, but used the same made-up words the doctor had used.  The doctor smacked the table and shouted, “By God, now you’ve got it!”


We were conducting an undercover operation in a small village restaurant in Northwest Ohio to document that our subject was working as a waitress. After our subject took our food order, delivered our food and drink, she gave us our check. We paid it, gave her a tip, and showed her our credentials, asking her if she worked there. She immediately froze, stared at the badge while behind the cash register and said, “No, I ain’t workin’ here.”   Our agent replied, “We want our tip back.”