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Posts Tagged ‘Billing for services not rendered’

BWC Investigations Result in 13 Workers’ Comp Fraud Convictions in October

 Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) Administrator/CEO Stephen Buehrer today announced 13 individuals were convicted of or pleaded guilty to charges related to defrauding Ohio’s workers’ compensation system during October. The court actions are the result of investigations conducted by BWC’s special investigations department (SID). The department works to deter, detect, investigate and prosecute workers’ compensation fraud. The cases bring total convictions in calendar year 2011 to 114.

“Cases like these remind us why detecting and prosecuting fraud must be a very high priority,” said Buehrer. “Whether it’s an injured worker, an employer or provider, it is incredible that anyone would game the system to gain something is not rightfully theirs, at the expense of others who end up paying the bill.”

Below is a sampling of cases that resulted in a guilty plea or conviction during October.

James Landis (Canfield, Mahoning County) pleaded guilty Oct. 24 to a felony count of workers’ compensation fraud for working while receiving benefits. An anonymous tip led to an investigation into whether Landis was working at his business, Mum’s The Word Florist, while receiving workers’ comp benefits. Landis stated on multiple occasions that he was incapable of working in any capacity. However, SID verified Landis was the primary operator of the business while on temporary total disability. He interacted with customers, arranged and delivered flowers, set up floral displays at events, and did all administrative paperwork. Landis is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 15. As a condition of his sentencing, he has agreed to repay $8,065.81 in investigative costs. He has repaid 19,000 he received improperly.

Roger Bolin (Nelsonville, Athens County) pleaded guilty Oct. 17 to workers’ compensation fraud and deception to obtain after he filed a false claim to receive narcotic prescriptions. SID received an allegation from an employer indicating Bolin filed a false claim. He indicated he was injured in September 2010, although he not worked for the company since June. Investigators obtained documentation showing Bolin did file a false claim and obtained a narcotic prescription by deception. The Hocking County Common Pleas Court sentenced Bolin to eight months prison to run consecutively on each count. Bolin is currently serving a prison sentence related to a parole violation. The court ordered the new charges to be served consecutively to this sentence.

Donald Johnson (Trenton, Butler County) was sentenced Oct. 17 for deceptively obtaining numerous BWC paid narcotics from multiple physicians and using multiple pharmacies. SID identified Johnson for possible doctor shopping for narcotic drugs and an investigation revealed his deception to obtain narcotics. Johnson agreed in the Butler County Common Pleas Court to pay restitution owed the amount of $2,177.86.

Daniel Engle (Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga County) pleaded guilty to one count of workers’ compensation fraud for working while receiving benefits. SID opened an investigation after a BWC claims service specialist noted that Engle’s employer, the city of Shaker Heights, submitted a letter prepared by Engle. In the letter, Engle informed the city that he was resigning to start his own computer business. SID’s investigation verified Engle owned and operated DNC Computer while receiving BWC temporary total disability benefits. He claimed he was incapable of working in any capacity. Investigators established that Engle repaired computers, sold computers, and sold computer parts. Additionally, Deluxe Transportation/New Valley Taxi employed Engle as a taxi driver. Engle entered a guilty plea in Franklin County Municipal. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail suspended in lieu of three years probation. The court also ordered Engle to pay a $75 fine, court costs and investigative costs in the amount of $4,000. Engle has paid $15,500 in restitution.

Thomas McAllister (Amsterdam, Jefferson County) was sentenced for deception to obtain dangerous drugs. BWC’s intelligence unit began investigating McAllister after suspecting he was receiving narcotic prescriptions from several physicians and pharmacies. The investigation confirmed that McAllister used deception to obtain narcotic medication from various prescribing physicians. On Oct. 12, McAllister entered a plea of guilty to deception to obtain dangerous drugs, a fifth degree felony. The parties agreed to $424 in restitution. McAllister will be sentenced Nov. 30.

Mark Robinson (Fairfield, Butler County), pleaded guilty Oct. 2 to one count workers’ compensation fraud for working while receiving benefits. Robinson worked as a general contractor for Bed and Breakfast properties in Hamilton while collecting temporary total disability. He performed maintenance and contractor work at various rental properties. Robinson paid back the full criminal overpayment of $6,463.25 and investigative costs of $1,207.38 for a total of $7,670.63 restitution paid to the BWC.

Daren Snyder (Chillicothe, Ross County) pleaded guilty Oct. 3 in a Franklin County courtroom to fraud for working while receiving benefits. SID opened an investigation after receiving an allegation indicating Snyder was working while receiving temporary total disability and living maintenance. Investigators found Snyder did return to work as a self-employed plumber during the period he received benefits. Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 2.

If you suspect anyone is committing workers’ compensation fraud, let us know. You may report it online at http://bit.ly/reportfraud or you may speak with a fraud hotline agent by calling 1-800-OHIOBWC.

https://www.ohiobwc.com/home/current/releases/2011/111511a.asp

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In summary: SID Health Care Provider Team (HCPT)

October 27, 2011 1 comment

When providers commit workers’ compensation system fraud and other crimes against the State Insurance Fund, the SID Health Care Provider Team (HCPT) responds to ensure compliance and integrity of the system. The team is comprised of dedicated analysts and agents located statewide. SID has recently increased its staffing to combat provider fraud, such as billing for unnecessary or non-rendered services, practicing without an active license, overprescribing narcotics, operating pill mills, trafficking in drugs, operating injury mills, unbundling and/or upcoding.

In the last article, we explained that SID staff members furnish orientation and training to MCOs in how to meet their contractual obligation to detect and report fraud. These SID staff members, who successfully drafted and finalized “Special Investigations – MCO Fraud Reporting and Referral Requirements,” are professionals assigned to HCPT.

To bring criminal providers to justice, these talented HCPT professionals conduct joint investigations with dozens of other agencies, such as the FBI, IRS – Criminal Investigations, U.S. Department of Justice – Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and local law enforcement narcotics units, vice units and drug task forces. During the last two years, HCPT made 36 criminal referrals for prosecution to state, county and local prosecutors. During last year alone, their work resulted in the identification of over $8.2 million in savings to the State Insurance Fund.

Be on the Lookout

This concludes our provider fraud awareness series. Look for our next fraud awareness article that will describe how we collect on the debts owed to the BWC State Insurance Fund by subjects of our investigations. In the meantime, be sure to read more about the BWC Special Investigations Department’s strategies and successes in our SID FY 2011 Annual Report.

If you suspect that a subject is committing workers’ compensation fraud, let us know. You may report it online at http://bit.ly/reportfraud or you may speak with a fraud hotline agent by calling 1-800-OHIOBWC.

Extreme [con] games: Providers billing for unnecessary or non-rendered services.

October 11, 2011 1 comment

Billing document with penMost providers, in faithfulness to their patients and profession, avoid the extremes. Indeed, they accomplish their life’s mission as described in the modern version of the traditional Hippocratic Oath, by Dr. Louis Lasagna, in the profound words:

“I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures that are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism” [non-treatment].

Admittedly, even the best providers, through simple, human frailty, will sometimes fail. Occasionally, they over treat one patient and under treat another. As unfortunate as these occurrences are, they are certainly not criminal acts.

Yet, still other providers do, in fact, commit a crime when they over treat or under treat. Here’s how. The criminal provider engages in a pattern of intentional over treatment or non-treatment of patient(s). He or she attempts to deceive BWC, and/or other insurers, by submitting fabricated medical reports to justify falsified bills demanding payment for their unnecessary or non-rendered services. In the latter instance, the criminal provider displays brazen arrogance in submitting any bill for a service that was not provided to a patient. Millions of ‘reasonable people on the street’ have no difficulty deeming such acts as criminal. Thus, jurors appropriately hand down guilty verdicts in our criminal prosecution cases.

A Case In Point

We received an allegation from a managed care organization employee that a provider was billing for durable medical equipment not provided to claimants. The SID Health Care Provider Team (HCPT) interviewed patients and analyzed medical records. The investigation found the provider submitted fraudulent patient progress reports to BWC for reimbursement of medical supplies she did not provide to her claimants.

The subject pled guilty to one fifth-degree felony count of workers’ compensation fraud. The court sentenced her to serve one year of incarceration (suspended) and one year of community control, and to perform 80 hours of community service. The court ordered the subject to pay BWC $11,154: $5,577 in restitution and $5,577 investigative costs.

Be on the Lookout

Red flags that may indicate a provider is engaging in billing for unnecessary or non-rendered services:

  • The provider ignores a patient’s or guardian’s questions about the necessity of a treatment;
  • The provider dismisses a patient’s or guardian’s necessity of a treatment questions with the excuse:  “It will cost the patient nothing; the Bureau or another insurer will cover the expense.
  • An “explanation of benefits” statement from BWC and/or another insurer lists services the patient does not recall receiving from the provider;
  • An “explanation of benefits” statement from BWC and/or another insurer lists dates of services on which the patient was not seen or treated by the provider, perhaps due to a canceled appointment; and
  • An “explanation of benefits” statement from BWC and/or another insurer lists non-feasible dates of service, dates when the provider would not have been available, perhaps on a weekend or holiday.

Look for our next fraud provider awareness article that will discuss providers who practice without a valid license. Meanwhile, be sure to read more about provider fraud investigations in our SID FY 2011 Annual Report.

If you suspect that a subject is committing workers’ compensation fraud, let us know. You may report it online at http://bit.ly/reportfraud or you may speak with a fraud hotline agent by calling 1-800-OHIOBWC.